robbiekarmel

Studio-apparatus-workshop-furniture

Posted in Drawing, woodwork by robbiekarmel on November 22, 2016

Since my confirmation a few weeks ago I have been playing around in the studio and workshop. The work has continued to focus on the phenomenological material intersections between myself, the workshop-studio, tools and materials, and the expanded environment.

These two drawings are full body scale mappings of my body and the studio-setup of drawings surfaces and studio-furniture. They serve as records of the interactions between the contributing elements as they facilitate and interrupt my actions of intentionally mapping out the perceptual experience of sitting, drawing, and being.

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By drawing upside down I am playing with interrupting the conventional ergonomics of drawing, an element that is so familiar to drawing that it recedes into the background and is rarely considered as an active element of process. In these drawings I hope to bring environmental factors like gravity, the body interrupting itself, and the relative position of the drawing surface back to the foreground, so that they become active elements that contribute to the activity of drawing. As I engage with and become familiar with these processes and assess the influence they have on the emergent drawings I begin to accomodate or acclimatise to their influence. This circular and recursive quality makes it difficult to assess such elements in their fresh uninterrupted and unassisted  state— as the process of their discovery reveals the properties that may prove interesting to assess as accessed through limited perceptual experience— any artificial limitations of perception (such as blindfolds) are immediately negated as soon as the manifest drawing is assessed.  Furthermore, the familiarity with how intentional actions create image-lines will forever influence how intentional lines are made in the future.

An example:  I have attempted to draw my head as projected onto a surface behind me before, I know that if I move the drawing stick ‘like-so’ recognisable marks will be laid down. I no longer need to assess and  re-assess the marks as compared to the source sensation to confirm their representational accuracy or capacity, as my familiarity with depicting noses and nostrils etc gives me the confidence to lay down the marks without second guessing their accuracy. It is worth noting here that I spend a lot of time drawing my nose, nostrils, and inner nose-throat-sinus-cavity as I experience them from sensations of proprioception, locatable internal itchiness, tongue probing and so on. I find that there is such a concentration of sensation in my head, sinus, hands, feet, and genitals that I amplify the representational gestures that record the experience of embodied being, the record becomes a homunculus of perceptual experience.


These drawing below are a smaller scale, each drawing is on an A2 sheet of paper. I have been experimenting with proprioceptive drawing from external viewpoints, imagined or simulated body positions, and projecting myself into positional relationships with objects. The first two drawings are done while sitting at my desk with the drawing pad in my lap, a position I spend a lot of time in, I find that if I don’t make a conscious effort to select an external viewpoint I project my body onto the paper through a trajectory in line with my head, however there seems to be no ‘front’ or ‘back’ to the manifest representation, in being flattened it takes a form that can be read as concave or convex.

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These drawings where done before the stool was complete, I had climbed on the frame but not mounted it or perched on it.

As I was drawing these I was looking at the incomplete stool with the seat slab balanced on the frame. I imagined/projected myself into the position as influenced by my attempts to climb the frame before the seat was attached.

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This drawing is a sketch of a planned piece of studio furniture, a small box on legs. I intend to to use the box in a similar manner to the other pieces of studio furniture, allowing the difficulty of balancing on the tiny object to impact the process of drawing.

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I have also just finished this piece of studio furniture, an impractically high surface to sit on. I will be starting a drawing using this stool soon, the height will again disrupt the comfortable ergonomics of drawing.

 

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These are my first attempts at carving alaia surfboards, I am not a strong surfer and haven’t done it for a few years, but I was recently introduced to the work of Tom Wegener (http://www.tomwegenersurfboards.com/about-tom-0) and got really excited about shaping a simple surfboard from a piece of wood. I’ll have a chance to try them out in a few weeks, we’ll see how it goes!

Big Drawing

Posted in Uncategorized by robbiekarmel on September 16, 2016

Last week I presented my confirmation paper at the UNSWAD Post Grad Conference, it was deemed satisfactory so I am now officially a PhD candidate on track to graduate around 2019. The paper outlined the work I’ve been making over the last 8 months, and some of the work was on display in the accompanying conference exhibition. This work serves as propositional pieces for what I will be doing over the next few years, so the ideas presented here will be expanded, experimented with, and refined before being presented as a part of my final thesis.

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Studio-Workshop

Posted in Uncategorized by robbiekarmel on July 5, 2016

I’ve been putting a lot of time into the garage, attempting to turn it into a proper workshop-studio. It’s a bit chaotic at the moment but once the walls are finished I should be able to clear it out and set it up nicely. It should give me somewhere to start working on some larger works that I am planning. Once the walls are done I’m planning on doing something about the lighting, the floor, and storage. This is hopefully going to be the space I work in for the rest of my PhD, so I want it to be as practical and comfortable to work in as I can manage.

26My vast pile of tools in the centre of the room, and the general chaos of perpetual attempts of planning, structuring, organising, and building my space.

28The second room out the back has even more stuff stored in it. It is a nice little room with a lot of light, but it’s going to be a while before I get to it.

27All of my benches waiting outside the studio-workshop.

25The inside drawing studio with recent works. I will be making a lot of work out in the workshop-studio, however having an inside room with a lot of space will allow me to work on multiple projects concurrently. I am planning on doing a series of large scale drawings at life-size, one of which is on the drawing board at the back. These works will be a continuation and extension of the blind proprioceptive experiments I have been working on.

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Life Drawing

Posted in Drawing, Drawing Experiments, life drawing by robbiekarmel on May 14, 2016

These are a series of proprioceptive life drawings, while wearing a blindfold I hold a pose and map out my body. I draw following a similar format to conventional life drawing sessions, the poses are between 3 and 5 minutes long.

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Drawings from recent life drawing sessions.

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Thinking Drawings

Posted in Uncategorized by robbiekarmel on May 2, 2016

This is a selection of thinking-drawings from my notebooks. They are a means to very quickly simulate, record, and test ideas for planned works. When planning out works there is a process of imagination and/or simulation; whether designing a chair or proposing an arrangement for a drawing/sculpture experiment I am internally acting out the process of making. The drawing is an active part of the thinking through of the propositions, as well as serving as a record of the process of thinking as well as the idea itself. The pencil and paper become an external memory system.

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^I have been drawing this proposed chair repeatedly, I find it easiest to plan and simulate the sitting-in and making-off the chair when I am sitting in a similar chair. So rather than looking at a chair in profile I am drawing myself from an external perspective, relying on my proprioceptive and tactile awareness, my understanding of the chair (and of what chairs are), my learned familiarity with the anatomy of chairs and the body, and my learned and practiced skill in mimetic representation.

In addition to the proposition of the function of the chair there is also the simulation of the making of the chair, what wood I have access to, how the tools will shape the wood, how the wood will respond to the tools, and so on. Before I even pick up a plane it is there as an extension of my body.

Although at first glance this sketching process may align itself more with design practice methods, I am using it as a launching pad for the consideration of drawing and making as extensions of the body. This process will also serve to plan the apparatus that I intend to make to facilitate  more complex arrangements of drawing and sculpting projects.

 

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Heads, Bodies, and Furniture – Progress

Posted in Uncategorized by robbiekarmel on April 27, 2016

These are some drawings and process shots from my ongoing drawing experiments. I’m beginning to expand the drawings to include a larger network of objects and perceptual information. In the first two images the drawing is a tactile and proprioceptive drawing of myself and the bust. Soon I will be developing the sculptural work further, beginning with blind proprioceptive and tactile representations of my own body, similar to the two vague forms to the left and right of the central bust in this drawing, and to the blind proprioceptive drawing below.

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^ This third drawing is done entirely through proprioception, mapping out the body through my awareness of position in space, I do not need to fondle my face or the chair to know where they are or how to draw them. There are two interwoven factors here, one is my awareness and memory of the shape and position of the objects at hand—although i am only touching the chair in a few places (the seat, footrests). The second is my practiced skill at representing these objects with more familiar methods, having drawn countless bodies and chairs.


I am still working on the sculpted wooden bust. I have been going back and forth between drawing on the bust while blindfolded, again relying on my familiarity and awareness of my head and face. I then use these marks as a guide as to what material to remove, which is problematic in that I am influenced by my desire to make the bust mimetically accurate, rather than faithfully follow the marks. Ultimately the work being done ends up as a compromise between these two elements.

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I have a few reservations about this work, the process is clunky, labour intensive, and time consuming, and the pine is quite soft and bruises easily. Working with harder timber, and starting with a blank closer to the final proportions of the body may help, but will also require a dramatic overhaul of process, and will require a fair bit of machining and powertooling to achieve.

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Finally, I have been considering the role of workshop and studio furniture in my practice. As the drawing and sculptural aspects of the work develop they are beginning to expand to include consideration and depiction of the props and apparatus involved in the process: the ground, benches, plinths, chairs, drawing boards etc. For example, in the blind proprioceptive drawing of myself sitting in the chair (above) a lot of my understanding of the form of the chair comes from designing the chair I have been working on (shown here). As such I have been designing and constructing my own studio and workshop furniture. Initially these are following fairly familiar forms, but as the project progresses I plan on introducing new structures to facilitate different arrangements and relationships between myself, subjects, drawing surfaces, working sculptures, and collaborators.

Back To The Drawing Board

Posted in Drawing by robbiekarmel on March 14, 2016

It’s been about a year since I last posted here, apologies for the extended hiatus! I have recently started my PhD research, which focuses on concepts of tool use and the expanded body, particularly in relation to drawing and making.  There will definitely be more frequent posts for the foreseeable future.

In extending my drawing practice to include three-dimensional objects I have begun to experiment with carving. Below is one of my first forays into the media, as I am doing everything by hand it is a time consuming process, stay tuned for updated progress shots.

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^the work is embedded in my drawing practice, rather than working from planned drawings I started by drawing blind proprioceptive self portraits on the blank torso and will continue to mark out the work utilising similar experimental drawing methods.

 

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I am also continuing my on going enquiries into observational and representational drawing. The busts that I have been producing provide ambiguous forms to hang drawings on.

 

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I have also been maintaining ongoing life drawing sessions to maintain, expand, and experiment with my technical skills.

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Woodworking

Posted in Uncategorized by robbiekarmel on April 13, 2015

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I’ve spent the last few weeks concentrating on making a few simple pieces of furniture and working on building workbenches. I will be hold a business launch event on the 16th of May, details for the event are here: https://www.facebook.com/events/1606284696253463/

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benches on benches: much workbench with two other benches in production— a chairmakers workbench on top of my bench and a shavehorse in the background.

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You Are Here 2015: Sculptural Experiments

Posted in Uncategorized by robbiekarmel on March 30, 2015

Last weekend I was in Canberra for the You Are Here festival, I presented work at the third overnight event at Canberra Museum and Gallery. This year I did an initial proof of concept of something I’ve wanted to do for a while: extending participatory art making into sculptural work.

The process was built on the participatory drawing exercises: I massages and prodded participants faces and heads as they manipulated the clay bust in direct response to my input.

Hopefully I’ll have an opportunity to present this work in a more complete and sustained context soon, I’d love to do a developing series and display them as completed works.

A big thankyou to the seven people who participated in the project:

Shane Parsons

Reuben Ingall

Anna Reeder

Yasmin Masri

Morgan Little

Hannaka

Luke Jaaniste

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Working with Shane Parsons, image credit: Adam Thomas

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The bust as it was before work started.

and the completed sculpture:

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The Drawing of Bodies and Things — Exhibition

Posted in Drawing, Exhibitions, Participatory Drawing, woodwork by robbiekarmel on November 3, 2014

The Drawing of Bodies and Things opened last week, the show went really well, I’ve presented several talks to visitors and undergraduate groups and everyone has been very receptive and engaged in great conversations about drawing.

Several people joined me in performative participatory drawings on the opening night, a big thanks to Kyla Cassells, Richard Carroll, and Eliza Vince.

A big thanks to everyone who came to the opening and who has visited the show, the exhibition will be up until the 8th of November, Wednesday til Saturday at Kudos Gallery, Paddington.

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